Recording and/or writing? Weighing the benefits of reflective practices

Date
2020
Authors
Wheeler, Ann
Waltje, Jörg
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Magna Publications
Abstract

Let’s come right out with it: Reflecting about learning is a commendable practice that should be embedded into any learning experience! For both teachers and students, reflecting is an important practice to make sense of what one has been doing and/or learning. The concept of reflection as an “educative process” dates back to the work of John Dewey (1933), who pointed out that experience alone does not constitute learning; instead, a conscious realization must occur so that an experience can truly become a source of learning. More explicitly, reflective assignments “require students to engage in critical reflection and higher order thinking; they force students to be more open-ended and less prescriptive; and they permit students to be creative and questioning” (Dyment & O’Connell, 2011, p. 92).

Description
Article originally published in Faculty Focus. English. Published Online 2020. https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/educational-assessment/recording-and-or-writing-weighing-the-benefits-of-reflective-practices/
Permission to deposit this file was given through direct contact with the publisher. For more information please see the faculty member's entry in Project INDEX -- EDH 7/7/23
Keywords
Classroom videos, Discussion board assignments, Flipgrid, Reflective practices, Student reflection exercises
Citation
This is the published version of an article that is available at https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/educational-assessment/recording-and-or-writing-weighing-the-benefits-of-reflective-practices/. Recommended citation: Wheeler, A., & Waltje, J. (2020, July 29). Recording and/or writing? Weighing the benefits of reflective practices. Faculty Focus. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.
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