Recovering the rhetorical tradition: George Campbell’s Sympathy and its Augustinian roots

Date

2015

Authors

Fehler, Brian

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

BYU ScholarsArchive

Abstract

The year 1776 saw the production of two important documents of the Enlightenment: the US Constitution and George Campbell's The Philosophy of Rhetoric. Both documents were products of Enlightenment thought, and both demonstrate the conflicting attitudes in the era toward the rhetorical use of emotional appeals. Recent scholarship by John Witte examines the religious roots of the anti-emotionalist rhetoric expressed by Federalist politicians in the Constitutional era and in particular the influence of the Calvinist clergy of New England, with their "Puritan covenantal theory of ordered liberty and orderly pluralism:' Like the Federalists who were in charge of the new US government, the Calvinists of New England not only celebrated the victory achieved in the Revolution but also worked to ensure that the new American republic did not descend into the kind of chaos that later consumed revolutionary France.

Description

Keywords

George Campbell, Enlightenment, US Constitution, Rhetorical tradition

Citation

This is the published version of an article that is available at: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/rae/vol5/iss1/10. Recommended citation: Fehler, B. (2015). Recovering the rhetorical tradition: George Campbell’s Sympathy and its Augustinian roots. RAE: Religion in the Age of Enlightenment, 5, 88–112. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.