Student Creative Arts and Research Symposium | 2024

Permanent URI for this collectionhttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/16148

27th Annual Student Creative Arts and Research Symposium

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    GUIDING COMMUNICATION IN COUPLES POSTINFIDELITY
    (2024) Love, E.; O'Neal, C.; Lucero-Jones, R.; Lucero-Jones, R.
    How does betrayal trauma from infidelity impact communication in couples and the family system? In a review of the literature on best practices for infidelity treatment, this presentation will offer marriage and family therapists and other mental health clinicians an opportunity to learn how to guide couples through communication after infidelity discovery. Participants without a clinical background will learn about the application of theory to infidelity treatment. Attachment styles shape the way individuals respond to and cope with infidelity and betrayal trauma. Participants will learn about the erosion of trust leading up to and after learning about infidelity, with considerations for the impact of culture on communication. Additionally, participants will learn about applying Emotionally Focused Therapy to infidelity treatment. After completing a case study exercise based on the information learned, participants will have an opportunity to provide comments, ask questions, and offer reflections on the material. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Rebecca Lucero-Jones) Supported by TWU Center for Student Research.
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    EXPLORING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY-BASED AND HANDS-ON LEARNING ACTIVITIES TO HELP MITIGATE MATHEMATICS-RELATED STRESS AND INSECURITY
    (2024) Barrera, H.; Cooley, S.; Wheeler, A.
    In the pursuit to boost student achievement and cultivate a favorable outlook towards mathematics, this project intends to address the core issue of math anxiety and explore strategies for educators to more effectively mitigate it. The primary objective is to perform a comprehensive analysis and comparison of two distinct sets of lesson plans–one featuring hands-on interventions and the other incorporating digitally executed activities–with the purpose of discerning their respective effects on students’ math performance and perspectives. One of the four lesson plans, which integrated mathematics with computer science and involved coding with Python P5, was executed in Dr. Wheeler’s mathematics education course in the Fall of 2023. The implemented lesson plan was carefully assessed by reviewing student work and gathering feedback. In this project presentation, both sample student work and detailed lesson content will be shared. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Ann Wheeler) Supported by TWU Experiential Student Scholars Program.
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    SELF-EFFICACY AND RESILIENCE AMONG TOKEN WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS
    (2024) Lemmon, L.; Smith, G.; Lambert, J.; Smith, G.
    Previous research has explored the impacts of tokenism on women entrepreneurs regarding heightened visibility, polarization, and assimilation pressures. While various studies have explored the barriers and challenges women entrepreneurs experience due to gender bias and tokenism, further research is needed to explore the phenomenon of resiliency and self-efficacy among this population. In this study we will further explore these themes and examine how self-efficacy and resilience may play a role in coping and thriving in these traditionally male dominated spaces. We will conduct qualitative interviews with women thriving in leadership roles to further illuminate instances of resiliency and self-efficacy of women in male-dominated fields. We will conduct 5 semi-structured interviews with diverse women leaders about their experiences in leadership using an interpretive phenomenological analysis. We hypothesize that there will be themes found in token women entrepreneur research that suggests a strong sense of self-efficacy and remarkable resilience in women entrepreneurs. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Gabrielle Smith) Supported by TWU Small Grant Program.
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    INTERSECTIONALITY OF RACE AND GENDER FOR TOKEN BLACK WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS
    (2024) Lemmon, L.; Smith, G.; Lambert, J.; Smith, G.
    Research has indicated that women entrepreneurs face heightened visibility and scrutiny. Kanter’s lens of visibility, polarization, and assimilation highlights the barriers and challenges women entrepreneurs must overcome to exist and thrive in traditionally male dominated spaces. However, further research is needed to address the unique and persistent challenges encountered by Black women entrepreneurs due to compounding racial and gender biases. In this study, we will investigate the intersectionality of race and gender for Black women entrepreneurs and explore the impacts of token bias when taking both race and gender into consideration. We will conduct qualitative interviews with women thriving in leadership roles to illuminate the impacts of race and gender on Black women in male-dominated fields. We will conduct 5 semi-structured interviews with Black women leaders about their experiences using an interpretive phenomenological analysis. We hypothesize that Black women entrepreneurs face amplified token bias due to both gender and race. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Gabrielle Smith) Supported by TWU Small Grant Program.
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    PLAYFUL PARENTING: NURTURING CONNECTION AND DEVELOPMENT THROUGH PLAY
    (2024) Wolfe, K.; Wallace, H.; Arrendondo, A.; Bias, L.; Armijo, J.; Armijo, J.
    "Playful Parenting: Nurturing Connection and Development Through Play" is a 12-month program designed for new parents or parents of children between the ages of 0-2, providing information about play and its importance to a child’s development during the first two years. The findings of a study conducted in recent years demonstrated that parents have a difficult time seeing value in free play or unstructured activities (Dhas et al. 2022). Building upon this research, our program allows parents to learn about what milestones their children are expected to reach and how play can be used as a developmental tool to assist them in reaching their milestones. The program offers interactive workshops, presentations, and speakers that will help build a foundation for understanding how to use play to reinforce development and as a medium for interacting with your child at various stages of development. (Faculty Sponsor: Mr. Juan Armijo)
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    IMPACT OF AMD-3100 ON CELL MORPHOLOGY AND MOVEMENT
    (2024) Coloura, C.; Spencer, J.; Satani, K.; Martins, A.; Spencer, J.
    Human cytomegalovirus is a widespread pathogen that infects the majority of the population but causes little disease except in immune-compromised individuals. HCMV encodes a viral cytokine, cmvIL-10, that engages the host cellular IL-10 receptor (IL-10R), inducing downstream signaling. Binding of cmvIL-10 to IL-10R also impacts signaling from other host receptors, especially the chemokine receptor CXCR4 which is essential for development and immune responses. We used a chemical inhibitor of CXCR4, AMD-3100, to study effects of cmvIL-10 on CXCR4 signaling. Human ARPE-19 cells growing in a monolayer were “scratched” to create a wound, then movement of cells filling in the wound was observed using the Incucyte Live-Cell Imaging System. The results show that AMD-3100 impairs cmvIL-10-induced cell movement into the wound, and that the treated cells have a distinct morphology compared to control cells. Further investigation is needed to determine whether AMD-3100 also impairs signaling from the IL-10R during virus infection. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Juliet Spencer)
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    OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AND TYPE 2 DIABETES
    (2024) Randall, Audrey; Rivers, Alannah
    Diabetes has been categorized as a public health emergency, which is complicated by barriers to necessary selfmanagement; including inadequate communication with physicians and poor disease knowledge. Occupational therapists offer unique services by integrating many different elements of rehabilitation with an understanding of illness and psychosocial elements, as well as a knowledge of how to analyze and adapt to one’s environment (Ellexson, 1985). The methodology is an online questionnaire conducted through Prolific and participants are patients with T2D, consisting of two subsamples; those who have seen an occupational therapist and those who have not. This poster aims to analyze how outcomes differ for patients who have worked with an occupational therapist or who have one on their care team compared to those without. We also aim to analyze occupational therapy alliance and correlates such as treatment adherence, perceived benefit, perceived burden, well-being, anxiety, depression, diabetes self-efficacy, HbA1c levels and coping strategies. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Alannah Rivers)
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    DEVELOPMENT, CONTENT VALIDITY, AND SCALE RELIABILITY OF THE PHYSICAL THERAPY SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH SCALE (PT-SDHS)
    (2024) Bjork, E.; Patel, R.; Rethorn, Z.; Patel, R.
    This study describes the development, content validity, and reliability of the Physical Therapy Social Determinants of Health Scale (PT-SDHS). Addressing inequities is critical for providing effective clinical care and improving population health. Currently, no tool exists to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students’ education or competence with social determinants of health (SDOH). The Association for Medical Education in Europe best practices for developing questionnaires for educational research guided development. The PT-SDHS showed high item and scale content validity after expert validation. Factor analysis of 254 DPT student responses revealed five content domains (Knowledge, Attitudes, Personal Barriers, Professional Preparation, and Beliefs About Others) and 27 accepted items. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.70 (satisfactory) to 0.96 (excellent). The PT-SDHS is the first psychometrically valid and reliable instrument related to educating DPT students on five SDOH domains. This tool could aid development and assessment of SDOH educational interventions for healthcare students. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Rupal Patel) Supported by TWU Center for Student Research.
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    ENHANCING NURSING EDUCATION AND PATIENT SAFETY: EXPLORING THE IMPACT OF THE "ROOM OF HORRORS" SIMULATION PROJECT
    (2024) Garcia, Guadalupe; Wilson, Cecilia
    Patients frequently encounter harm during hospital stays, with those with diabetes particularly susceptible to medication errors and glycemic complications. The 'Room of Horrors' (ROH) project aims to bolster nursing students' critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills concerning patient errors in hospital environments. Through simulated scenarios, ROH engages students in error identification, rectification of unsafe conditions, and intervention prioritization. The project's significance lies in its potential to enhance clinical competency and patient safety by integrating theoretical knowledge with practical application. Evaluation of nursing students' satisfaction and confidence in learning will be conducted using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning tool. Results are pending. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Cecilia Wilson)
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    THE GENDER GAP IN S.T.E.M.
    (2024) Myers, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Navarra-Madsen, J.
    The scarcity of women in S.T.E.M. originates in their youth due to insufficient amount of support in their educational and home environments. The stereotyping that men are more suited for challenging careers discourages young girls from pursuing S.T.E.M. This research will discuss issues leading to this ongoing problem. From counselors to family members, women who advance in their education see a decrease in promotion and motivation for S.T.E.M. programs compared to their male counterparts causing gender segregation. Whether intentional or not, a lack of familiarity in a room influences one's optimism when carefully choosing their next steps into a potential occupation. Furthermore, the lack of excellent role models and mentors exacerbates the alienation of the next generation of women who have aptitudes for STEM fields. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Junalyn Navarra-Madsen)
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    RELIABILITY AND VALIDATION OF THE PROFESSIONAL FULFILLMENT INDEX WITH PHYSICAL THERAPISTS
    (2024) Miller, K.; Thompson, M.; Thompson, M.
    Background: More than 50% of physical therapists (PTs) have burnout linked to poor well-being. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the gold standard, is cost prohibitive for widespread use. The Professional Fulfillment Index (PFI) is free and validated with the MBI for physicians and pharmacists. The study purpose was to assess the PFI for testretest reliability, internal consistency, convergent/concurrent validity with the MBI in PTs. Methods: Eight organizations sent survey link to their PTs and 82 responded from FL (n=23), NY (n=19), OH (n=6), OR (n=21), and TX (n=19). A subset of 28 respondents completed the PFI a second time. Results: Testretest reliability of the PFI was good to excellent (ICC = 0.90, P <.001), internal consistency was high (α = 0.92) and convergent/concurrent validity between the PFI and MBI was good (r = .66, p < .001). Conclusion: The PFI is a valid and reliable measure of PT burnout. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Mary Thompson) Supported by TWU Center for Student Research.
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    COULD VIRAL PROTEINS LEAD TO TREATMENTS FOR ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE?
    (2024) McHaffie, S.; Hanson, L.; Hanson, L.
    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is being seen at higher rates than ever before. One pathology is the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. In recent years, studies have found a correlation between herpesviruses and AD. This information has led to several studies testing the role of herpesviruses in Alzheimer’s pathology. Dr. Hanson’s lab found an initial decrease and later increase in tau hyperphosphorylation in murine cytomegalovirus-infected (MCMV) cells. My research seeks to understand the mechanism of the apparent decrease in hyperphosphorylation. I harvested uninfected and MCMV- infected B35 lysates at various times after infection with or without an inhibitor of viral replication. Through western blot, I have confirmed the presence of proteins by probing tubulin, presence of viral infection by probing E1, and inhibition of late gene expression by probing major capsid protein. I am currently looking at tau. We predict that the inhibitor will lead to lower than normal phosphorylation of tau. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Laura Hanson)
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    AMONG ADULTS WITH DIABETES TYPE 2, DOES HERBAL MEDICINE HELP TO STABILIZE BLOOD GLUCOSE COMPARED TO NO USAGE?
    (2024) Le, Anh Tuyet; Cesario, Sandra
    Global glycemic control has declined. The undiagnosed diabetic ratio is 1:3 (BMI>23) in Southeast Asians versus 1:5 (BMI>25) worldwide. Potential causes include reduced beta cell function, impaired insulin action related to lower muscle mass, and high ectopic fat deposits in the liver and muscle. Diabetes causes a moderately low quality of life in social and mental health. Herbal medicine is the study and practice of medicinal plants, which are still underutilized to achieve therapeutic management and healthy lifestyles in diabetic control. Herbal medicine has multiple benefits, such as low cost, minimal to no side effects, reduction of diabetic complications (cardiovascular, retinal neuropathy), effective control of carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., onion-quercetin, grapevine- resveratrol), and improvement of overall health, insulin sensitivity, secretion, and hypoglycemic effects (high content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, and glycosides). Scientists are encouraged to incorporate herbs into comprehensive medication reviews and prescriptions from early diabetic stages. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sandra Cesario)
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    LACK OF CYTOPATHIC EFFECTS IN BREAST CANCER CELLS INFECTED WITH HUMAN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS
    (2024) LaRue, I.; Garcia, E.; Martins, A.; Spencer, J.; Spencer, J.
    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the herpesvirus family that evades the host immune system and establishes life-long latency. While HCMV typically causes clinical disease only in immunocompromised people, it may contribute to chronic conditions, reduce immune function, and promote tumor progression. HCMV has been associated with invasive tumors and metastatic spreading in breast cancer. To investigate the impact of HCMV on breast cancer, we infected breast cancer cells and evaluated cell morphology using the Incucyte Live Cell Imaging System. While normal epithelial cells showed clear cytopathic effects following HCMV infection, breast cancer cells did not exhibit morphology changes or undergo cell lysis. These results suggest that HCMV infection may proceed differently in tumor cells compared to normal cells, possibly due to genetic mutations or abnormal tumor cell physiology. These findings demonstrate that HCMV infection of breast cancer cells has complex effects that may contribute to tumor progression. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Juliet Spencer) Supported by TWU Center for Student Research.
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    OIL REMEDIATION USING 12-N-12 GEMINI SURFACTANT IN SAND
    (2024) Justice, P.; Jordan, A.; Aguilar, D.; Sheardy, R.; Sheardy, R.
    An estimated 706 million gallons of oil are lost to the environment per year, the impacts are widespread from water pollution, loss of habitats, and shoreline erosion. While there are many oil remediation (OR) techniques, our focus lies in physical-chemical remediation. Gemini surfactants (GS) are a promising use in OR techniques due to the low toxicity to the environment and high efficiency. With the use of 12-n-12 (where n=2,3,4,5,6) GS, we are exploring its potential in OR due to its ability to form micelles at extremely low concentrations, known as the critical micelle concentration (cmc). To evaluate its efficacy as an OR technique, we contaminated sand with common motor oil and added varying concentrations of the GS solution to attempt to remove the motor oil from the silica sand. The results of our experiment will be analyzed by various spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic techniques. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Richard Sheardy) Supported by Robert A. Welch Foundation M-0200, NSF Award 1953448
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    TRACKING THE TRAJECTORY OF RECYCLED PLASTIC USING TECHNOLOGY
    (2024) Joshi, U.; Beatty, J.; Beatty, J.
    The demand for plastics is steadily rising, yet very little gets recycled due to its complex chemistry and cost to recycle. Plastic, being non- degradable, contributes to various forms of chemical pollution. Currently, recycling is one of the few means to mitigate plastic waste, but it requires proper disposal methods, ensuring it reaches recycling centers instead of landfills and not the environment. Despite municipalities offering recycling services to its residents, logistical hurdles often impede the plastic's journey to these centers. Apple's Airtags, utilizing Bluetooth technology, can track items over long distances using nearby iPhones to relay location information back to the AirTag owner, potentially aiding in waste management and tracking. This study aims to utilize Apple AirTags to monitor the movement of plastic waste intended for recycling in Denton County. By attaching Airtags to plastic waste, we'll track and report their trajectories. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. John Beatty) Supported by NSF Award 1953448.
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    COMBATING RACIAL AND ETHNIC MICROAGGRESSION EXPERIENCES WITH PARENT INVOLVEMENT
    (2024) Iven, I.; Banks, C.; Hinton, M.; Banks, C.
    Although research has indicated that racial and ethnic microaggressions occur frequently in adults, there is a growing body of studies reflecting its occurrence and resulting negative outcomes during adolescence and secondary school. This research examined the interaction between parental involvement, racial and ethnic microaggressions, and adolescent well-being. The study utilized online surveys from 142 adolescents to gain quantitative data measuring observations of microaggressions, experiences of microaggressions, and adolescent well-being. Findings indicate a relationship between observing and/or experiencing microaggressions and adolescent well-being. The principal findings suggest that perceived parental involvement moderated the association between both experiencing and observing microaggressions and well-being. The results contribute to the understanding of how schools can help create a healthy learning environment that supports adolescent well-being, student engagement, and a positive school climate. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Courtney Banks) Supported by Sam Houston State University.
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    A NOURISHING SPACE: GROWING CLIENT-CENTRIC HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS
    (2024) Honse, S.; Prajapati, M.; Hong, C.; Cobos, J.; Chavez, D.; Davis, K.; Massey-Stokes, M.; Brito-Silva, F.; Kelly, M.; Kelly, Michelle
    In 2021, "A Nourishing Space" (ANS) was launched to provide health and wellness-related majors with health coaching and entrepreneurial experience. In a collaboration among Nutrition and Food Sciences, Health Studies, the Health and Wellbeing Initiative, and JNIWL, student coaches learn to provide client-centered care and build business skills. The ‘23- ’24 cohort was trained in multiple components: nutrition assessment, motivational interviewing, behavioral psychology, and private practice competencies. By using a theory-based coaching curriculum, the coaches supported client self-efficacy, motivation, and accountability in consultations. ANS expanded from 23 consultations in ‘21-’22 to over 60 consultations during the ‘23-’24 academic year, with 70% retention of clients in the fall ‘23 semester. ANS is an innovative pilot program promoting student wellbeing, while providing the ANS coaches with training in health coaching. Through this experiential learning opportunity, student coaches will be able to successfully apply their newly developed skills and entrepreneurial knowledge in future careers. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Michelle Kelly) Supported by TWU Jane Nelson Institute for Women’s Leadership.
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    EMPLOYMENT PERSPECTIVES OF, FOR, AND BY INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
    (2024) Hademenos, David; Fredrickson, Rebecca
    By providing appropriate and reasonable supports that require minimal time or cost, individuals with intellectual and development disabilities (IwIDD) can thrive in employment, including in business or military (Werner & Hochman, 2017a; Werner & Hochman, 2017b), obtaining agency and independence, as well as acquire new skills and social connections (Kocman & Weber, 2018; Timmons et al., 2011). Likewise, as long as care is taken to set clear expectations (Kocman et al., 2017), organizations will acquire a capable employee, as well as enhance morale, engagement, and team cohesiveness (Werner & Hochman, 2017a). Finally, family members of IwIDD also value employment as it develops pride, independence, purpose, and community engagement (Carter et al., 2023). Altogether, these perspectives provide strong support for addressing barriers to employment for IwIDD. This research advances understanding that employment of IwIDD is both a morally good choice as benefits IwIDD, and one that benefits others, including employing organizations. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Rebecca Fredrickson)
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    PLANTS VS MICROBES: THE ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECTS OF NATIVE PLANTS
    (2024) Dwamena, Priscilla; Hanson, Laura
    Although often traditionally used in an attempt to cure or as a preventative treatment, the true antimicrobial effects of plants are not often certain. With the growing incidence of antibiotic resistance, finding new ways to treat things such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has growing importance. This research’s aim is to assess whether certain native plants, which have been used as therapies have antimicrobial properties against representative bacteria, Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Bacillus megaterium). Using parts from the selected plants and taking into account how traditional medicine is commonly taken, aqueous extracts were prepared in ultra-pure water at a 4:1 ratio of water to plant material. Prior to testing for inhibition of mouse cytomegalovirus (a herpesvirus model which would allow future studies on intravaginal infection), extracts were tested for toxicity on mouse macrophage cells to ensure any viral inhibition was not due to death of cells. (Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Laura Hanson)