Does tele-health training stack up to on-site executive control training for youth and adults with TBI?

Date
2016
Authors
Vas, Asha
Cook, Lori
Keebler, Molly
Chapman, Sandra
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
International Brain Injury Association and North American Brain Injury Society
Abstract

Medical practitioners have long recognized potential contributions that tele-health (also referred to as tele-medicine or tele-practice) can make regarding equitable access of services, especially in rural and remote populations (Scalvini, et al., 2004). Tele-health has become integral to many hospitals to (1) increase patient access to care, (2) enable health care providers to connect with patients, (3) provide consultation, health monitoring, mental health services, education, pharmacological services, and (4) offer counselling. According to American Hospital Association (2015), 52% of hospitals utilized some form of tele-health in 2013, and the number of hospitals and other medical institutions adopting tele-health approaches is expected to increase in the coming years.

Description
Article originally published in Brain Injury Professional, 12 (4), 12-15. English. This article is no longer available online and does not have a DOI. Permission to deposit this file was given through direct contact with the publisher. For more information please see the faculty member's entry in Project INDEX -- EDH 7/7/23
Keywords
Improved health care, Tele-cognitive rehabilitation, Tele-cognitive training
Citation
Recommended citation: Vas, A. K., Cook, L., Keebler, M., & Chapman, S. (2016). Does tele-health training stack up to on-site executive control training for youth and adults with TBI? Brain Injury Professional, 12 (4), 12-15. This is the published version of an article that has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.