Role perceptions of women diagnosed as having premenstrual syndrome (enactment, menstrual tension)

Date
1985-05
Authors
Brown, Eddielene
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Abstract

This investigation sought to describe the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and their effects on role enactment. A post-test only study design was utilized with a sample of 29 young adult females, ages 15 to 48, with a diagnosis of PMS, 15 of whom were receiving progesterone and 14 who were not.

Theoretical formulations were derived from Symbolic Interaction and Role Theory. Taped interviews were conducted utilizing open-ended questions. The null hypotheses tested were: (1) There is no significant difference in the symptomology of PMS clients taking progesterone and those not taking progesterone. (2) There is no significant difference in the various role enactments of PMS clients taking progesterone and those not taking progesterone. (3) There is no significant difference in changes of physiological symptomology's influence on role functions' behavioral changes in clients taking progesterone and clients not taking progesterone. (4) There is no significant difference in changes of psychological symptomology's influence on role functions' behavioral changes in clients taking progesterone and clients not taking progesterone.

Results indicated statistically significant differences (Z(,29) = 6.36, P < .05) in the symptomology of PMS clients taking progesterone and those not taking progesterone; no statistically significant difference in role enactments of PMS clients taking progesterone and those not taking progesterone; a statistically significant difference (Z(,29) = 4.09, P < .05) in physiological symptoms' influence and role functions; and a statistically significant difference (Z(,29) = 4.61, P < .05) in changes of psychological symptomology's influence on role functions' behavioral changes in clients taking progesterone and clients not taking progesterone.

Based on the findings, it was concluded that non-progesterone clients experience fewer physical symptoms and fewer psychological symptoms than progesterone clients, and that there was a significant difference in symptoms experienced by progesterone and non-progesterone clients. Although there was no statistically significant difference in role enactments of progesterone and non-progesterone clients, there was significance in symptomology's influence on role function.

Description
Keywords
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS), Role enactment, Physical symptoms, Progesterone clients
Citation