Healthcare utilization disparities among lung cancer patients in US hospitals during 2010– 2014: Evidence from the US Hispanic population’s hospital charges and length of stay

Date
2022-02-09
Authors
Miller, Anastasia
Kim, Sun Jung
Medina, Mar
Delgado, Rigoberto
Chang, Jongwha
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Dovepress
Abstract

Lung cancer remains a leading cause of death in the United States as the second most common cancer. In 2018, there were 218,520 new lung cancer cases, and it was the leading cause of cancer death that year. That same year, 10,183 lung cancer cases were from Hispanic patients, and 5540 Hispanic patients died. Comparatively, there were 23,417 new lung cancer Black patients, 1353 new cases in American Indian and Alaskan natives, and 6590 new cases in Asian and Pacific Islander patients. Despite advances in screening, treatment, and tobacco prevention, lung cancer attributed to over 1.8 million worldwide deaths in 2018 and was about 23.5% of all cancer deaths in 2019 in the United States. Worldwide, in 2020, there were 2,206,771 new lung cancer cases and 1,796,144 new lung cancer deaths, second in both categories only to female breast cancer. Lung cancer also has the highest cancer mortality rate in men worldwide. By 2021, the estimated number of new lung cancer cases in the United States will be 12.4% of all cancer cases and contribute to 21.7% of cancer deaths.

Description
Article originally published in International Journal of General Medicine, Volume 15, 1329–1339. English. Published online 2022. https://doi.org/10.2147/ijgm.s348159
Keywords
Hispanic patients, Lung cancer, NIS sample, Healthcare utilization
Citation
This is the published version of an article that is available at https://doi.org/10.2147/ijgm.s348159. Recommended citation: Kim, S. J., Medina, M., Delgado, R., Miller, A., & Chang, J. (2022). Healthcare utilization disparities among lung cancer patients in US hospitals during 2010–2014: Evidence from the US Hispanic population’s hospital charges and length of stay. International Journal of General Medicine, Volume 15, 1329–1339. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.