Texas Government- Chapter 12, Section 3: Texas-sized Challenge

Date
2019
Authors
Danley-Scott, Jennifer
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Globalyceum
Abstract

While Texas has many problems to face, few are as pressing as natural disasters. Climate change, zoning, building codes, and urban sprawl combine to create deadly scenarios where increased weather volatility is causing death and property damage. Texans approach the weather with a shrug, noting, “If you don’t like the weather, just wait a few minutes. It’ll change.” Yet weather causes great damage due to decisions made by developers, governments, and people. As the residents of coastal Texas experienced in 2017 with Hurricane Harvey, current government policy may not be adequate. To meet that need, Texas planning and emergency management policy are currently undergoing massive changes in an effort to keep citizens, businesses, and properties safe in the future. Focus Questions: What is the difference between recovery and resilience? Who declares disasters and evacuations in Texas? What must a governor do to receive disaster assistance from the US government? How have local government plans changed, post Hurricane Harvey?

Description
Keywords
Resilience, 500-year floods, Floodplains, Stafford Act (1988), Emergency management coordinator, Texas Emergency Management Plan, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Texas Division of Emergency Management
Citation