Tart cherry in amelioration of pain in the elderly

dc.contributor.authorTiernan, Casey
dc.contributor.authorImrhan, Victorine
dc.contributor.authorPrasad, Chandan
dc.contributor.authorVijayagopal, Parakat
dc.contributor.authorJuma, Shanil
dc.creator.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9870-7626
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-11T18:03:30Z
dc.date.available2023-04-11T18:03:30Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.descriptionArticle originally published in Nutrition and Aging, 3(2-4), 203–217. English. Published online 2016. https://doi.org/10.3233/nua-150060
dc.description.abstractBackground: Tart cherry, rich in bioactive polyphenols, has received attention in the past decade for reported health benefits due to its high polyphenolic content.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine whether there is a potential role for tart cherry or its isolated components in amelioration of pain relief in chronic diseases that may affect the elderly.
dc.description.abstractMethods: In vitro and in vivo human and animal studies that utilized tart cherry or extracts of tart cherry compounds to determine an effect on oxidative stress, inflammation, muscle damage, and pain were reviewed and summarized (Table 1).
dc.description.abstractResults: Tart cherry and its isolated compounds have demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro and in vivo which may improve self-reported pain. In humans, these include modest improvements in gout flare incidents, and self-reported pain in fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis (OA), and conditions of induced oxidative stress and muscle damage. Beneficial biochemical changes were also reported for inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers such as serum urate, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, most studies reported to date have insufficient sample size, treatment duration, and statistical power to draw any firm conclusions.
dc.description.abstractConclusions: Consumption of tart cherries and their bioactive constituents may be a potential novel therapy for reducing the pain associated with chronic diseases particularly common to an aged population. Larger, more rigorous trials are needed to reach any firm conclusions.
dc.identifier.citationThis is the published version of an article that is available at https://doi.org/10.3233/nua-150060. Recommended citation: Tiernan, C., Imrhan, V., Prasad, C., Vijayagopal, P., & Juma, S. (2016). Tart cherry in amelioration of pain in the elderly. Nutrition and Aging, 3(2-4), 203–217.. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/14808
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3233/nua-150060
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherIOS Pressen_US
dc.rights.holder©IOS Press and the authors.
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC 3.0
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectAnthocyaninsen_US
dc.subjectAnti-inflammatoryen_US
dc.subjectAntioxidanten_US
dc.subjectCherryen_US
dc.subjectMuscle damageen_US
dc.subjectNutraceuticalsen_US
dc.subjectPainen_US
dc.subjectPolyphenolsen_US
dc.titleTart cherry in amelioration of pain in the elderlyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

Files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Prasad-Tart cherry in amelioration of pain in the elderly.pdf
Size:
156.7 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:

License bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.68 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description: