Examining physical activity and the relationship between physical activity, gross motor development, and segmental trunk control in preterm and full-term infants

dc.contributor.advisorJackson, Elaine
dc.contributor.committeeMemberThomas, Jodi
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPoskey, Gail
dc.creatorSilveira, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-22T21:32:04Z
dc.date.available2023-02-22T21:32:04Z
dc.date.created2022-12
dc.date.issued2022-12-01T06:00:00.000Z
dc.date.submittedDecember 2022
dc.date.updated2023-02-22T21:32:05Z
dc.description.abstractPreterm infants demonstrate decreased gross motor ability as compared to full-term infants. Previous studies have hypothesized that preterm infants may receive fewer opportunities to practice gross motor skills due to parental perception of vulnerability. The purposes of this study were to determine if preterm infants are given similar opportunities to be physically active as compared to full-term infants and examine if physical activity is related to motor development. Twenty-four full-term infants and 13 preterm infants completed the AIMS, SATCo, Daily Activities of Infants Scale (DAIS), and parent-reported physical activity questionnaires. The relationship between physical activity, segmental trunk control, and gross motor ability was also investigated using multiple regression, with term group, physical activity, and segmental trunk control serving as predictor variables for gross motor ability. There was no significant difference in physical activity between preterm and full-term infants. Segmental trunk control was a significant predictor of gross motor ability, while term group and physical activity were not significant predictors. This study found that majority of infants are not achieving the World Health Organization physical activity guidelines for infants, with many infants spending greater than one hour at a time in restrictive equipment. Preterm infants and full-term infants appeared to receive similar opportunities to practice gross motor skills and term group and physical activity were not significantly related to gross motor ability. Segmental trunk control was a significant predictor of gross motor ability and appears to be an important factor when addressing gross motor development in infants.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/14481
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.subjectGross motor development
dc.subjectSegmental trunk control
dc.subjectPediatric
dc.subjectPhysical therapy
dc.subjectHealth promotion
dc.titleExamining physical activity and the relationship between physical activity, gross motor development, and segmental trunk control in preterm and full-term infants
dc.typeDissertation
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Health Sciences
thesis.degree.departmentPhysical Therapy
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysical Therapy
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Woman's University
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy

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