Chronic foot pain and foot solutions in adults from different professions: The I-Corps-National Science Foundation Foot Health Survey PREPRINT (VERSION 2)

Date
2021
Authors
Mbue, Ngozi
Wang, Wanyi
Rosario, Martin
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Research Square
Abstract

Background: Chronic foot pain (CFP) is a major contributor to sick leave and early retirement among individuals in all professions, especially those whose jobs require prolonged standing, lifting and walking. Current treatment modalities are inadequate in managing CFP. Hence, there is a significant need for new treatment options to manage chronic foot pain. The objectives of this study are i) explore the current state of chronic foot pain; ii) investigate current solutions and treatment options; and iii) explore opportunities for future inventions to address chronic foot pain.


Methods: Between April 2019 and September 2020, our team embarked on an I-Corps-National Science Foundation (NSF) programs in the United States to obtain information from stakeholders. Individualized, open-ended, mostly face-to-face interviews from nurses, athletes, construction and restaurant workers, among others were conducted.


Results: Preliminary data (N = 119) showed that current solutions and treatments for CFP were insufficient in managing moderate to acute pain (mostly pain scale 5 on a scale of 0–10). Those with ≥ 5 pain, changed shoes (63.3%), used shoe inserts, nursing clogs and painkillers (53.3%), and compression stockings (40%), with none reporting effectiveness. Fisher's exact tests were used to examine the relationships between regions (foot, heel and leg) and pain solutions. Regions (foot and heel) and shoe change were significantly related (p = 0.006) with participants using 5–7 pairs of shoes interchangeably, spending approximately $500-$700/year on new shoes. Female nurses 30–40 years experienced the highest foot pain than those younger. No significant differences in nursing and other professions with regards to CFP and solutions.


Conclusions: The majority expressed interest in trying new products to relieve their chronic foot and heel pain. Risk factors for foot pain included prolonged standing, walking, and lifting heavy objects. Current solutions are inadequate for managing moderate to acute foot pain in those who stand for prolonged periods of time on their feet. Innovations are urgently needed to address CFP.

Description
Keywords
Chronic foot pain, Professions, I-Corps, National Science Foundation
Citation
This is a pre-print version of an article that is available at https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-356021/v2. Recommended citation: Mbue, N., Wang, W., & Rosario, M. (2021). Chronic foot pain and foot solutions in adults from different professions: The I-Corps-National Science Foundation Foot Health Survey PREPRINT (VERSION 2). This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.
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