Clinical considerations and exercise responses of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: What have we learned in 20 years?

dc.contributor.authorBrubaker, Peter H.
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Wesley J.
dc.contributor.authorHaykowsky, Mark J.
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-21T15:34:06Z
dc.date.available2022-10-21T15:34:06Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.descriptionArticle originally published by the Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology, 9(1), 17–28. English. Published online 2020. https://doi.org/10.31189/2165-6193-9.1.17
dc.descriptionPermission to deposit the published version was given through direct contact with the publisher. For more information please see the faculty member's entry in Project INDEX -- EDH 7/13/23
dc.description.abstractHeart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for approximately 50% of all heart failure (HF) cases and is the fastest growing form of HF in the United States. The cornerstone symptom of clinically stable HFpEF is severe exercise intolerance (defined as reduced peak exercise oxygen uptake, VO2peak) secondary to central and peripheral abnormalities that result in reduced oxygen delivery to and/or use by exercising skeletal muscle. To date, pharmacotherapy has not been shown to improve VO2peak, quality of life, and survival in patients with HFpEF. In contrast, exercise training is currently the only efficacious treatment strategy to improve VO2peak, aerobic endurance, and quality of life in patients with HFpEF. In this updated review, we discuss the specific central and peripheral mechanisms that are responsible for the impaired exercise responses as well as the role of exercise training to improve VO2peak in clinically stable patients with HFpEF. We also discuss the central and peripheral adaptations that contribute to the exercise training-mediated improvement in VO2peak in HFpEF. Finally, we provide clinical exercise physiologists with evidence-based exercise prescription guidelines to assist with the safe implementation of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programs in clinically stable patients with HFpEF.en_US
dc.identifier.citationThis is the published version of an article that is available at https://doi.org/10.31189/2165-6193-9.1.17. Recommended citation: Brubaker, P. H., Tucker, W. J., & Haykowsky, M. J. (2020). Clinical considerations and exercise responses of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: What have we learned in 20 years? Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology, 9(1), 17–28. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/14125
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.31189/2165-6193-9.1.17
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherClinical Exercise Physiology Associationen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright © 2020 Clinical Exercise Physiology Association
dc.subjectExercise intoleranceen_US
dc.subjectPathophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectPeak exercise oxygen uptakeen_US
dc.subjectExercise trainingen_US
dc.subjectCardiac rehabilitationen_US
dc.titleClinical considerations and exercise responses of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: What have we learned in 20 years?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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