Assessing attitudes toward Covid-19 prevention: Defining two attitudes crucial for understanding systemic and social variables associated with disparities

dc.contributor.authorRivers, Alannah Shelby
dc.contributor.authorClifton, Mona
dc.contributor.authorPizzuto, Alexandra E.
dc.contributor.authorBuchanan, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorSanford, Keith
dc.creator.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8826-4606
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-27T15:59:26Z
dc.date.available2023-03-27T15:59:26Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.descriptionArticle originally published in Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 9(3), 1030–1039. English. Published online 2021. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01042-3
dc.description.abstractThis study tested a conceptual model identifying two distinct types of attitudes people may have toward following recommendations to prevent COVID-19. These attitudes were expected to be important for understanding types of systemic and social variables associated with health disparities such as racial discrimination, residential environment, lack of healthcare access, and negative healthcare experiences. The conceptual model was drawn from previous work examining adherence to medical recommendations that identified two distinct and consequential attitudes that influence behavior: perceived benefit (believing recommendations are effective and necessary) and perceived burden (experiencing recommendations as unpleasant or difficult). Approximately equal proportions of Black and White individuals living in the USA (N = 194) were recruited to complete an online survey. A psychometric analysis indicated that perceived benefit and burden attitudes were two distinct and meaningful dimensions that could be assessed with high validity, and scales demonstrated measurement invariance across Black and White groups. In correlation analyses, benefit and burden attitudes were robustly associated with neighborhood violence, healthcare access, and healthcare experiences (but not with experiences of discrimination), and all these associations remained significant after accounting for subjective stress and political affiliation. These findings have implications for increasing compliance to public health recommendations and addressing health disparities.en_US
dc.identifier.citationThis is the post-print of an article that is available at https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01042-3. Recommended citation: Rivers, A. S., Clifton, M., Pizzuto, A. E., Buchanan, A., & Sanford, K. (2021). Assessing attitudes toward Covid-19 prevention: Defining two attitudes crucial for understanding systemic and social variables associated with disparities. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 9(3), 1030–1039. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/14741
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01042-3
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.subjectAdherenceen_US
dc.subjectAttitudesen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectHealth disparitiesen_US
dc.titleAssessing attitudes toward Covid-19 prevention: Defining two attitudes crucial for understanding systemic and social variables associated with disparitiesen_US
dc.typePost-Printen_US

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