The relationship between depression, job satisfaction, and the length of time working on an AIDS unit

Date

1993-12

Authors

Parkman, Suzanne

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Abstract

This descriptive study explored the relationship between depression and job satisfaction, and the length of time a nurse has worked in direct care of AIDS patients. The population studied were nurses who are often intensely involved with these young and terminal patients. Stress, burn-out, and poor coping have been linked to AIDS, because of the negative image and fatality of the disease. The sample (n = 24) consisted of 17 RNs and 7 LVNs (15 men and 9 women). The years of AIDS experience ranged from 3 months to 9 years. Findings included no significant correlation between depression and job satisfaction, and length of time working with AIDS patients. There was a correlation between depression and an individual's perceived poor physical health (r=.42,p≤.05,n=24) and depression and perceived poor mental health (r=.42,p≤.05,n=24). There was a correlation between low job satisfaction and perceived inadequate financial status. However, the men were found to be more satisfied with their job than the women. Results indicate that future studies should be conducted that reflect certain characteristics specific to an AIDS unit.

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Keywords

Nursing

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