The effect of contingency contracting on compliance to the medical regimen in hypertensive black females

Date

1993-12

Authors

Johnson, Regena Bartie

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Abstract

The purpose of this research project was to investigate the difference in compliance to a medical regimen among hypertensive black females who engaged in contingency contracting and those who did not engage in contingency contracting. A two-group, pretest-posttest, non-equivalent control group, quasi-experimental design was employed. Subjects were obtained by convenience sampling from an outpatient hypertensive clinic in the southcentral portion of the U.S. Five areas of compliance were investigated using the Compliance Questionnaire: (1) decreasing smoking, (2) increasing exercise, (3) reduction of sodium intake, (4) taking medication(s), and (5) weight control. Both groups were pretested, received educational information, then posttested after one month, but the experimental group engaged in contingency contracting on two occasions prior to posttesting. Analysis using ANCOVA revealed no observed significant mean differences in compliance to any of the five variables among hypertensive black females who engaged in contracting and those who did not engage in contingency contracting.

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Keywords

Hypertension, Medical compliance, Heart health, Cardiovascular disease

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