The lived experience of dying at home for elderly male hospice clients

Date

2001-08

Authors

Lynd, Mary Hysell

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Abstract

Increasing numbers of elderly are dying at home. Nurses continually illuminate choices for clients who walk the path of terminal illness yet are unaware of the meaning of dying at home for the client. This study illuminated the lived experience of dying at home for a group of elderly male hospice patients.

Participants were 10 white males, 67–83 years old, who were dying at home. All were Ohio residents and were willing to share the meaning of dying at home.

Parse's (1985) research methodology was used to analyze the unstructured, videotaped interviews held every other week in the participants' home from the initiation of the study until death ensued. Common themes were identified and analyzed for level of congruency with the structure and concepts of Parse's theory of Human Becoming using the N.U.D.I.S.T. computer data analysis program.

The structural definition of dying at home for the participants was struggling with loss of self amidst gaining and losing vitality through interchange with cherished others and changing perspectives of the world, hopes, and dreams. The findings support the theoretical principles and concepts of Parse's theory of Human Becoming (1992). Nursing modalities identified by the participants as helpful included touch, imagery, music therapy, pet therapy, humor, and reminiscence.

Description

Page 51 missing and pagination error with page 89

Keywords

Health and environmental sciences, Social Sciences, Dying at home, Elderly, Hospice, Men

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