Breast self-examination practice among Black women: Implications for health education strategies

Date
1993-05-30
Authors
Thompson, Joselyn Henry
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Abstract

This descriptive correlational study investigated the relationships between selected health belief variables and BSE frequency in a population of black women (N = 271). Instruments were based on the Health Belief Model which formed the conceptual framework of this investigation. The ANOVA and multiple regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the educational level and the frequency of BSE (p = .05). The multiple regression analyses showed no statistically significant relationships between three variables, the knowledge of breast cancer, health locus of control and perceived susceptibility, and the frequency of BSE. The stepwise multiple regression analyses indicated statistically significant (p = .05) relationships between three variables, perceived benefits, perceived barriers and health motivation, and the frequency of BSE. Health education focused on enhancing the aspects of perceived benefits of BSE, rather than on perceived susceptibility to the disease, might be more effective.

Description
Keywords
Health and environmental sciences, Social sciences, Education, Women's health
Citation
Collections