The perceptions of well-being among single Black mothers who have experienced unintended pregnancy: A qualitative study

Date
3/30/2020
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Abstract

The qualitative study phenomenologically examined the perceptions of well-being among single Black mothers who have experienced unintended pregnancy. This study was framed through the lens of bioecological theory, and single Black mothers were considered as developing persons within the contexts of their microsystem settings of home and community. Unintended pregnancy among single Black women is a very significant issue with long-lasting implications, because near 70% of all Black births, nationally, are to single Black women. The researcher interviewed 10 single Black mothers who had experienced unintended pregnancy. The audio of these semi-structured interviews were recorded and transcribed. In response to two research questions, manual coding generated eight themes: (1) perceptions of high resilience, (2) perceptions of stressful lives, (3) perceptions of lowered mental health status, (4) perceptions that education is important, (5) interpersonal relationships contribute, (6) coping strategies contribute, (7) family structure contributes, and (8) access to reproductive healthcare contributes. Study results were compared to existing literature about single Black mothers. Strengths, limitations, and recommendations for future research, policy, and practice were discussed.

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Keywords
Unintended, Pregnancy
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