Deceptive communication in the workplace: An examination of beliefs about verbal and paraverbal cues

Date

2010

Authors

Hart, Christian L.
Fillmore, Derek
Griffith, James

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Individual Differences Association, Inc.

Abstract

Lies and other forms of deception in the workplace exact a tremendous financial toll on companies and organizations around the world. In this study, 240 employees from numerous businesses and municipal organizations completed a survey in which they indicated the degree to which they believed various aspects of communication change when people lie in the workplace. In support of the hypothesis, the employees held incorrect beliefs about fifteen of the eighteen verbal and paraverbal communication cues that were examined, suggesting that most employees may lack the information necessary to detect liars. The implications of these finding are discussed.

Description

Article originally published in Individual Difference Research, 8, 176-183. English. Published online 2010. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/286883462
Journal and publisher appear to be defunct and website is triggering malware warnings. Per Amanda Zerangue, will deposit published version.

Keywords

Non-verbal behavioral cues, Non-verbal deceptive behaviors, Verbal cues of deception

Citation

This is the published version of an article that is available at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/286883462. Recommended citation: Hart, C. L., Fillmore, D. G., & Griffith, J. D. (2010). Deceptive communication in the workplace: An examination of beliefs about verbal and paraverbal cues. Individual Difference Research, 8, 176-183. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.