Occupational stress, well-being, and pediatric occupational therapists: A mixed-methods study

dc.contributor.advisorBowyer, Patricia
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFletcher, Tina
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRoberts, Heather
dc.contributor.committeeMembermiller anastasia
dc.creatorGoffredo, Christopher Adam 1982-
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-6210-8103
dc.date.accessioned2024-06-07T19:50:56Z
dc.date.available2024-06-07T19:50:56Z
dc.date.created2024-05
dc.date.issued2024-05
dc.date.submittedMay 2024
dc.date.updated2024-06-07T19:50:56Z
dc.description.abstractOccupational stress is a risk factor for the sustainability of occupational therapy. This mixed methods study aimed to investigate the self-reported stress levels of pediatric occupational therapists. A qualitative descriptive approach followed a quantitative descriptive correlational study. The results indicated that a third of pediatric occupational therapists surveyed for this study scored severe to dangerous levels of workplace stress, with another third falling into the moderate range of workplace stress. The mean stress score of this study compared to the mean score of the validating sample of the Workplace Stress Scale (WSS) indicated that there were significantly higher stress levels of the participants in this study compared to the validating sample with a large effect size. The WSS and the Work Environment Impact Scale-Self Report (WEIS-SR) demonstrated a significant positive relationship. WSS and the WEIS-SR significantly negatively correlated with the Scales of General Wellbeing-clinical tool. Being married is the only significant predictor of increased occupational stress and decreased well-being. The significant well-being predictors of occupational stress were calmness, connection, autonomy, awareness, optimism, and development. The interplay of positive and negative work experiences of occupational stress shaped the participant's work functioning and well-being. It provided detailed descriptions to understand further the dynamic interaction between occupational stress, general well-being, and work functioning. All three are needed for pediatric occupational therapists' health, employee retention, and professional sustainability.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.uri
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/16204
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.subjectPediatric Occupational Therapists
dc.subject.otherStress
dc.subject.otherOccupational Stress
dc.subject.otherWell-being
dc.subject.otherWork
dc.subject.otherOccupational Therapy
dc.subject.otherOccupational Therapists
dc.subject.otherPediatrics
dc.subject.otherWellness
dc.subject.otherBurnout
dc.titleOccupational stress, well-being, and pediatric occupational therapists: A mixed-methods study
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Health Sciences
thesis.degree.departmentSchool of Occupational Therapy
thesis.degree.disciplineOccupational Therapy
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Woman's University
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.programAPA 7th edition
thesis.degree.schoolTexas Woman's University

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