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dc.contributor.authorAnyiam, Shalom
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-16T16:01:21Z
dc.date.available2022-05-16T16:01:21Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/13717
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this literature review is to summarize Black women’s experiences and perceptions of midwifery care. Black pregnant women in the United States are at an increased risk for poorer birth outcomes such as higher preterm birth rates and have the highest maternal mortality rates of all other racial/ethnic groups. Adverse maternal outcomes for Black pregnant women stem from health inequities related to access to quality care and structural racism in the healthcare system. Numerous studies comparing maternal outcomes associated with the midwifery model of care to those of conventional maternity care highlight improvement and decrease in adverse outcomes for socially at-risk communities, specifically Black women. Black women report interest in utilizing midwives as maternal care providers due to the person-centered approach associated with the midwifery model of care. The literature reflects the need for more research related to access to midwifery care for Black women.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of Black Pregnant Women on Birth Center and Midwifery Careen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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