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dc.contributor.authorCsiza, Linda
dc.contributor.authorMedley, Ann
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-02T20:04:06Z
dc.date.available2022-03-02T20:04:06Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-28
dc.identifier.citationCsiza L, Medley A (2016) Determination of the effectiveness of a community based exercise program, Tai Chi, for people with multiple sclerosis, a pilot program. Phys Med Rehabil Res 1: https://doi.org/10.15761/PMRR.1000103en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://doi.org/10.15761/PMRR.1000103
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/13529
dc.descriptionThis is a published version of a paper that is available at: https://www.oatext.com/Determination-of-the-effectiveness-of-a-community-based-exercise-program-Tai-Chi-for-people-with-multiple-sclerosis-a-pilot-program.php#Article. Recommended citation: Csiza L, Medley A (2016) Determination of the effectiveness of a community based exercise program, Tai Chi, for people with multiple sclerosis, a pilot program. Phys Med Rehabil Res 1: doi: 10.15761/PMRR.1000103.This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) a progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system affects 2,300,000 people worldwide. Impaired balance is seen in up to 75% of individuals with MS which can lead to falls and further disability. Tai Chi, a form of martial arts, involves slow controlled movements and deep breathing. The physical benefits of Tai Chi include improved balance and flexibility.en_US
dc.description.abstractMETHODS: Participants were recruited from the surrounding metropolitan area. Inclusion criteria were: diagnosis of MS, ages 18-75, able to understand the informed consent, attend Tai Chi class, and attend a 60-120 minute testing session before and after the six week class. Activity was approved by the IRB at Texas Woman’s University. Pre-testing included completion of the intake form, Timed Up and Go (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand (5TSTS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), and Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC). Post-testing included the TUG, BBS, 5TSTS, DGI, and the ABC. The intervention was a 6 form Community-based Tai Chi program. Class was twice a week for one hour at a personal training gym.
dc.description.abstractRESULTS: Twenty-five participants completed the pre-testing. Only 15 participants returned for post-testing. All types of MS were represented. Data analysis using the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test identified significant improvement in the BBS (p=0.003), the TUG (p=0.018), and the 5TSTS (p=0.003).en_US
dc.description.abstractCONCLUSIONS: A community based Tai Chi program identified improvements in balance in the BBS, and TUG. Strength improvements were seen in the 5TSTS. Benefits identified warrant further studies using Tai Chi to improve balance and strength.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOpen Access Texten_US
dc.subjectTai Chien_US
dc.subjectBalanceen_US
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosisen_US
dc.titleDetermination of the effectiveness of a community based exercise program, Tai Chi, for people with multiple sclerosis, a pilot programen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
dc.creator.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1411-5063


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