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dc.contributor.advisorBeins, Agatha
dc.creatorGandy, Rachelle Leigh
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-21T16:40:55Z
dc.date.available2020-08-21T16:40:55Z
dc.date.created2020-08
dc.date.issued2020-08-17
dc.date.submittedAugust 2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/12458
dc.description.abstractI examine the impact familial and social dynamics play in bi/multiracial (my term for non-monoracial people) women’s sense of their own racial identity. I argue for the need to reevaluate our understanding of colorism when applied to bi/multiracial individuals who are the amalgamation of their parent’s interracial relationship. Their lived experiences show that lighter skin and other bodily features that signify “whiteness” are not necessarily or always more desirable. As the bi/multiracial women I spoke with demonstrate, claims to nonwhite identity categories or to multiple racial and ethnic identities may reflect attempts to externalize one’s own sense of self and/or desires to belong with one’s kin.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectBiracial
dc.subjectMultiracial
dc.subjectBi/multiracial
dc.subjectMixed
dc.subjectMonoracial
dc.subjectBiracial women
dc.subjectRace
dc.subjectRacial Identity
dc.subjectRacial Identity Development
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectMulatto
dc.subjectRacial
dc.subjectMicroaggression
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectHair
dc.subjectBeauty
dc.subjectColorism
dc.subjectIntersectionality
dc.titleBiracial identity development: A study of colorism and racial invalidation
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2020-08-21T16:40:56Z
thesis.degree.departmentMulticultural Women's and Gender Studies
thesis.degree.disciplineMulticultural Women's and Gender Studies
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Woman's University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Art
dc.type.materialtext


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