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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Kathleen E.
dc.contributor.authorXilong, Li
dc.contributor.authorAdams-Huet, Beverley
dc.contributor.authorSandon, Lona
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-05T21:47:56Z
dc.date.available2020-08-05T21:47:56Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-23
dc.identifier.citationDavis, K., Li, X., Adams-Huet, B., & Sandon, L. (2018). Infant feeding practices and dietary consumption of US infants and toddlers: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012. Public Health Nutrition, 21(4), 711-720. doi:10.1017/S1368980017003184en_US
dc.identifier.issnhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980017003184
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/12364
dc.description.abstractObjective: To compare infant and toddler anthropometric measurements, feeding practices and mean nutrient intakes by race/ethnicity and income. Design: Cross-sectional analysis using general linear modelling. Ten years of survey data (2003–2012) were combined to compare anthropometric measurements, feeding practices and mean nutrient intakes from a nationally representative US sample. Setting: The 2003–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Subjects: Infants and toddlers (n 3669) aged 0–24 months. Results: Rates of overweight were higher among Mexican-American infants and toddlers (P=0·002). There were also several differences in feeding practices among groups based on race/ethnicity. Cessation of breast-feeding occurred earlier for non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American v. non-Hispanic white infants (3·6 and 4·2 v. 5·3 months; P<0·0001; P=0·001). Age at first feeding of solids was earlier for white than Mexican-American infants (5·3 v. 5·7 months; P = 0·02). There were differences in almost all feeding practices based on income, including the lowest-income infants stopped breast-feeding earlier than the highest-income infants (3·2 v. 5·8 months, P < 0·0001). Several differences in mean nutrient intakes by both race/ethnicity and income were also identified. Conclusions: Our study indicates that disparities in overweight, feeding practices and mean nutrient intakes exist among infants and toddlers according to race/ ethnicity, which cannot be disentangled from income.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Health Nutritionen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectPediatricen_US
dc.subjectChild obesityen_US
dc.subjectFeeding behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectInfant nutritionen_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.titleInfant feeding practices and dietary consumption of US infants and toddlers: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.licenseCC Attribution ('CC-BY') license
dc.creator.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1290-1861


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