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dc.contributor.authorDanley-Scott, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-21T18:06:09Z
dc.date.available2019-11-21T18:06:09Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://globalyceum.com/table-of-contents-for-texas-government/
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/12043
dc.description.abstractWhile Texas has many problems to face, few are as pressing as natural disasters. Climate change, zoning, building codes, and urban sprawl combine to create deadly scenarios where increased weather volatility is causing death and property damage. Texans approach the weather with a shrug, noting, “If you don’t like the weather, just wait a few minutes. It’ll change.” Yet weather causes great damage due to decisions made by developers, governments, and people. As the residents of coastal Texas experienced in 2017 with Hurricane Harvey, current government policy may not be adequate. To meet that need, Texas planning and emergency management policy are currently undergoing massive changes in an effort to keep citizens, businesses, and properties safe in the future. Focus Questions: What is the difference between recovery and resilience? Who declares disasters and evacuations in Texas? What must a governor do to receive disaster assistance from the US government? How have local government plans changed, post Hurricane Harvey?en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherGlobalyceumen_US
dc.subjectResilienceen_US
dc.subject500-year floodsen_US
dc.subjectFloodplainsen_US
dc.subjectStafford Act (1988)en_US
dc.subjectEmergency management coordinatoren_US
dc.subjectTexas Emergency Management Planen_US
dc.subjectFederal Emergency Management Agencyen_US
dc.subjectTexas Division of Emergency Managementen_US
dc.titleTexas Government- Chapter 12, Section 3: Texas-sized Challengeen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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