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dc.contributor.advisorBusl, Gretchen Lynne
dc.creatorJendrzey, Elizabeth A
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-03T20:52:55Z
dc.date.available2019-07-03T20:52:55Z
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2019-06-27
dc.date.submittedMay 2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/11513
dc.description.abstractAlthough adaptations of media are ubiquitous in our society, little attention is paid by the general public as to why these adaptations have come into being. Because of this, this thesis seeks to understand what can be learned about an adaptor’s beliefs and ideals through a close analysis of the changes made between the source text and the adaptation. By examining Robert Caisley’s Tartuffe, Yaël Farber’s Mies Julie, and Richard Bean’s One Man, Two Guvnors, alongside their respective source texts Moliere’s Tartuffe, Strindberg’s Miss Julie, and Goldoni’s The Servant of Two Masters, a connection is found between the adaptor’s changes and their intentions, especially in respect to their intended audience.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectAdaptation
dc.subjectTheatre
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.subjectAudience
dc.titleTilting the stage: Adaptation to and from the theatre
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-07-03T20:52:55Z
thesis.degree.departmentEnglish, Speech, and Foreign Languages
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Woman's University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Art
dc.type.materialtext
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-8281-3579


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