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dc.contributor.authorMarino, Jeanne Mireille
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-14T14:27:26Z
dc.date.available2018-11-14T14:27:26Z
dc.date.issued2009-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11274/10761
dc.description.abstractThis study determined strategies that occupational therapists are using to improve the parent-child relationship and determined how effectiveness of the strategies is measured by the therapists. A self-developed survey was emailed and completed by early intervention occupational therapists across the United States. The likert scale had 94 respondents, and 74 responded to the open-ended questions. A regression analysis determined a significant difference between how therapists were trained in parent-child interaction and their survey scores, indicating that type of training impacts treatment. Therapists responded to the open-ended questions by either placing the therapist in control, the parent in control, or a blend of both. Analysis of responses revealed that although most therapists are delivering family-centered services, some are still delivering child-centered services. Results indicate that training, not experience, determined use of evidence-based treatment strategies thereby adding support for multi-modal trainings to increase the likelihood that occupational therapists will deliver family-centered services.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectHealth and environmental sciencesen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectEarly childhood educationen_US
dc.subjectEarly intervention
dc.titleThe effect of parent-child interaction training on early intervention occupational therapistsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.departmentOccupational Therapyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Woman's Universityen_US
thesis.degree.levelMasteren_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.committeeChairBaxter, Mary Frances


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